Content Map Terms

Fitness: Getting Around Barriers to Exercise

British Columbia Specific Information

Physical activity has so many benefits to your health. It can help you get to and stay at a healthy body weight, reduce the risk of bone fractures if you have osteoporosis, and can reduce the risk of many other illnesses like cancer and heart disease. For most people, participating in physical activity is safe. However, some people should check with their health care provider or a qualified exercise professional before they start becoming more physically active.

For information on the benefits of physical activity, setting goals and overcoming barriers, as well as safety tips and precautions, visit the Physical Activity section of our website.

If you have questions about physical activity or exercise, call 8-1-1 to speak to a qualified exercise professional, Monday to Friday from 9am to 5pm Pacific Time, or you can Email Physical Activity Services. You can also leave a message after hours.

Topic Overview

Even when you know the good things about being active, you may find it hard to change your lifestyle until you deal with the reasons you give yourself for not being active. Barriers to exercise include the valid reasons you aren't active and the excuses you make to avoid something you dislike or fear.

Why don't you exercise? For a few days or a week, write down your reasons for not exercising. Then for each of your reasons, write a response that prompts you to reconsider your choice. Look at this list of reasons and responses whenever you are about to make a choice about exercising.

Barriers to fitness

Reason for not being active

Possible solution

"I have no time."

"I'm too busy at work."

"I'm always feeling rushed."

"I have more important things to do."

Look at other people who are active and are about as busy as you. Talk with them about how they fit in physical activity. Think of ways to manage your time better. Ask your family for help with fitting in some time for exercise.

Try shorter periods of activity spread throughout the day, such as a few 10-minute walks.

"I'll look silly."

"I'm too old."

"I'm too out of shape."

"I'm too fat."

Join a group or take a class with others who look or feel like you do. You'll see that fitness is for all ages and shapes. Avoid places that make you feel more embarrassed. Start with walking, or try an exercise DVD at home.

Work with a fitness expert for a few sessions to help you get started.

"I'll have a heart attack."

"My knees are bad."

"I'll pull a muscle or sprain my ankle."

"I'll get overheated and faint."

See your doctor for a checkup, and ask him or her about what you can safely do. Read or talk with experienced people about preventing injuries. Have someone with experience watch you exercise to see if you are doing something that may put you at risk for injury.

Work with a fitness expert for a few sessions to help you get started.

"What if I get so hungry I eat more and gain weight?"

"What if I start to look like a bodybuilder?"

"What if...?"

Fear of the unknown is often not based on facts. Talk to more active friends or a health professional about your concerns. Ask yourself whether these reasons are masking other reasons.

"I'll be too cold (or too hot)."

Too hot, too cold, too wet, too windy. The weather may never seem right for exercise. Many people exercise no matter what the weather is like. Try a variety of indoor and outdoor activities. When it's cold, hot, or humid, take precautions.

"I don't have the money."

Being physically active doesn't need to cost money. Just parking farther away so you have a longer walk into the store, or taking the stairs instead of the elevator, will increase your activity. You can also exercise with low-cost items such as a jump rope or elastic bands. Or use items you already have, such as using milk jugs filled with water as weights for arm exercises. Do resistance exercises like push-ups or squats.

Knowing your own reasons for getting fit can help you set realistic goals and reach them. If one of your goals is to become more active to feel better, you are likely to succeed. It might be much harder to reach a goal to lose a certain amount of weight or to look like the people in health club ads.

Health Tools

Health Tools help you make wise health decisions or take action to improve your health.

Actionsets are designed to help people take an active role in managing a health condition.

Credits

Current as of:
September 10, 2020

Author: Healthwise Staff
Medical Review:
E. Gregory Thompson MD - Internal Medicine
Thomas M. Bailey MD - Family Medicine
Adam Husney MD - Family Medicine
Kathleen Romito MD - Family Medicine
Heather Chambliss PhD - Exercise Science
Christine R. Maldonado PhD - Behavioral Health