Physical Activity Log

It can take time to reach your physical activity goals. Using an activity log is a good way to measure your progress so you can see small improvements over time. This can help give you a sense of satisfaction, boost your confidence and keep you committed to regular activity.

Keeping a weekly log of activity is especially helpful if you’re just starting out, or if you’re setting goals and need to know what your current level of activity is.

How to Use a Weekly Physical Activity Log

  • Record your activity goals.
  • Record the type of activity you do and how long you’re active. For example, record any physical activity that lasts at least 10 minutes, or the number of steps you take.
  • Record notes on how the activity felt, what you noticed and things you learned while doing the activity.
  • Record any changes you’d like to make for the following week, if necessary. You may want to note what isn’t working and what might help you be active more regularly.

General Recommendations for Physical Activity

Gradually build up the amount of activity you do. Aim to do 30 to 60 minutes of activity each day, which can be done all at once or in several 10-minute sessions. Use a pedometer (an instrument that counts the number of steps you take).

General recommendations are to take 10,000 steps per day. Gradually work up to this by adding 500 steps to your total each week. Keep going until you gradually reach 10,000 steps per day.

DATE

TYPE OF ACTIVITY

GOAL

MINUTES OF ACTIVITY OR NUMBER OF STEPS

NOTES

Monday

       
Tuesday        
Wednesday        
Thursday        
Friday        
Saturday        
Sunday        

WEEKLY TOTAL

Changes I will make for next week:


  1.  

  2.  

  3.  

Last Reviewed: November, 2016


©2016 Province of British Columbia. All rights reserved. May be reproduced in its entirety provided the source is acknowledged. This information is not meant to replace advice from your medical doctor or individual counselling with a health professional. It is intended for educational and informational purposes only.

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