Iron-Fortified Infant Cereal Recipes: Finger Foods For Babies and Toddlers

Introduction

Iron is needed for your child's growth and development. Iron fortified infant cereal is an important source of iron for babies. Sometimes, as babies get older, they prefer more textured foods, and refuse infant cereal made as a pablum or prepared cereal. Here are some ways to use infant cereal in finger foods to help your child get the iron he needs.

When picking a cereal to use in these recipes, look at the Nutrition Facts table on the package and choose the infant cereal with the highest percent daily value (%DV) of iron per serving. A cereal with 100% daily value is best.

  • Compare serving sizes to make sure they are the same size.

The amount of iron in the recipes below is based on using a cereal with 100% daily value of iron. Serve these foods with vitamin C rich fruit such as kiwi, mango, strawberries or oranges to increase the amount of iron absorbed.

Oatmeal Pancakes

125 mL (½ cup) whole wheat flour
250 mL (1 cup) infant cereal, any variety
30 mL (2 Tbsp) sugar
15 mL (1 Tbsp) baking powder
150 mL (2/3 cup) rolled oats
375 mL (1 1/2 cups) water
2 eggs
45 mL (3 Tbsp) canola oil

Instructions

  • Soak oatmeal in water for 5 minutes.
  • Add oil and egg to oat mixture.
  • Mix dry ingredients together in a different bowl.
  • Combine dry and liquid ingredients.
  • Spoon 2 Tbsp (30 mL) of batter onto a greased frying pan or griddle at medium heat.
  • Cook about 3 minutes on each side or until done.

Please note that the batter will be slightly mushier than usual pancakes.

Yield: 24 pancakes. Each pancake contains 1.2 mg of iron.

Muffins

250 mL (1 cup) whole wheat flour
125 mL (1/2 cup) sugar
10 mL (2 tsp) baking powder
250 mL (1 cup) infant cereal, any variety
125 mL (1/2 cup) water
30 mL (2 Tbsp) oil
3 eggs, beaten

Instructions

  • Preheat oven at 180°C (350°F).
  • Mix flour, sugar, baking powder and infant cereal together in a large bowl.
  • Mix water, oil and eggs in a separate bowl.
  • Combine wet and dry ingredients only until blended.
  • Spoon batter into 24 greased muffin cups.
  • Bake for about 20 minutes.

Yield: 24 mini muffins. Each muffin contains 1.2 mg of iron.

Molasses Biscuits

60 mL (¼ cup) molasses
60 mL (¼ cup) butter or non-hydrogenated margarine
1 egg
5 mL (1 tsp) vanilla
175 mL (¾ cup) whole wheat flour
2 mL (½ tsp) baking soda
500 mL (2 cups) infant cereal, any variety
45 mL (3 Tbsp) water
10 mL (2 tsp) cinnamon (optional)

Instructions

  • Preheat oven to 180°C (350°F).
  • Mix molasses and butter or non hydrogenated margarine.
  • Add egg and vanilla.
  • In a different bowl, combine flour, baking soda and cereal.
  • Add flour mixtures to the butter or non-hydrogenated margarine mixture.
  • Add water and blend together.
  • Roll dough into small balls and drop on cookie sheet.
  • Bake 10 to 12 minutes.

Yield: 32 biscuits. Each biscuit contains 1.7 mg of iron.

Oatmeal Biscuits

500 mL (2 cups) rolled oats
60 mL (¼ cup) whole wheat flour
250 mL (1 cup) infant cereal, any variety
10 mL (2 tsp) baking powder
125 mL (1/2 cup) butter or non-hydrogenated margarine
125 mL (½ cup) brown sugar
2 eggs, beaten
5 mL (1 tsp) cinnamon, optional

Instructions

  • Preheat oven to 180°C (350°F).
  • Combine oats, flour, cereal and baking powder.
  • Beat butter or non-hydrogenated margarine with sugar and eggs in a separate bowl.
  • Mix butter or non-hydrogenated margarine mixture with dry ingredients.
  • Roll dough into small balls and drop on cookie sheet.
  • Bake 10 to 12 minutes.

Yield: 36 biscuits. Each biscuit contains between 0.9 mg of iron.

Last updated: November 2013


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