Anal Fistulas and Crohn's Disease

Topic Overview

Crohn's disease may cause sores, or ulcers, that tunnel through the intestine and into the surrounding tissue, often around the anus and rectum. These abnormal tunnels, called fistulas, are a common complication of Crohn's disease. They may get infected. Crohn's disease can also cause anal fissures. These are narrow tears that extend from the muscles that control the anus (anal sphincters) up into the anal canal.

An anal fistula can often be treated with medicines. But sometimes surgery to repair the fistula may be needed. Conservative treatment with antibiotics and medicines to reduce pain and inflammation is usually tried before surgery. Surgery for an anal fistula sometimes does not heal well or takes a long time to heal. So it is usually done only if there is a complication such as an abscess.

Anyone with an unusual anal fistula that does not respond to conservative treatment should be examined for Crohn's disease. A fistula is often the first sign of Crohn's disease. An examination may include anoscopy or sigmoidoscopy. These are tests that allow a doctor to view the lower rectum and lower large intestine through a viewing scope. Complete evaluation may require sedation because the examination can cause discomfort.

Related Information

Credits

ByHealthwise Staff
Primary Medical Reviewer E. Gregory Thompson, MD - Internal Medicine
Brian O'Brien, MD, FRCPC - Internal Medicine
Adam Husney, MD - Family Medicine
Specialist Medical Reviewer Arvydas D. Vanagunas, MD, FACP, FACG - Gastroenterology

Current as ofMarch 28, 2018

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