Topic Overview

Fat replacers are non-fat substances that act like fat in a food. An ideal fat replacer would be a substance that has no health risks and tastes and looks like natural fat but has fewer calories. Fat replacers can be found in foods such as baked goods, cheeses, sour cream, yogurt, margarine, salad dressing, sauces, and gravies.

Fat replacers are categorized into two basic types:

  • Carbohydrate-based. These are made from starchy foods, such as corn, cereals, and grains. Most fat replacers today are made from carbohydrate. Examples include cellulose, gelatin, dextrins, gums, and modified dietary fibres.
  • Protein-based. These are made by modifying protein, using egg white or whey from milk. Examples include whey protein and microparticulated egg white and milk protein (such as Simplesse).

Fat replacers may not be listed by their brand names on the ingredient label, which makes it hard for people to identify them in the foods they buy.

If you want to use fat replacers, think about the following:

  • Current research shows that carbohydrate- and protein-based fat replacers don't hurt health.
  • Foods that contain fat replacers may have fewer calories compared to foods that contain fat. But some people may tend to eat more of the food that contains a replacer, which makes up for the reduction in calories.

More research is needed on fat replacers. If you want to include fat replacers in your diet, talk with a registered dietitian.


Other Works Consulted

  • International Food Information Council Foundation (2009). Questions and answers about fat replacers. Available online:
  • International Food Information Council Foundation (2009). Uses and nutritional impact of fat reduction ingredients. Available online:


ByHealthwise Staff
Primary Medical Reviewer Kathleen Romito, MD - Family Medicine
Anne C. Poinier, MD - Internal Medicine
Specialist Medical Reviewer Rhonda O'Brien, MS, RD, CDE - Certified Diabetes Educator
Colleen O'Connor, PhD, RD - Registered Dietitian

Current as ofNovember 20, 2015