Pregnancy: Kick Counts

Topic Overview

After 18 to 20 weeks, you will notice that your baby moves and kicks more at certain times of the day. For example, when you are active, you may feel less kicking than when you are resting quietly. At your prenatal visits, your doctor may ask you whether the baby is active.

Kick counts. In the last trimester of your pregnancy, your doctor may ask you to keep track of the baby's movement every day. This is often called a "kick count." Counting your baby's kicks can help you learn your baby's movement patterns and recognize if there is a change. A change could be a sign of a problem. A common way to do a kick count is to see how much time it takes to feel 6 movements. Six movements (such as kicks, flutters, or rolls) in 2 hours or less are considered normal. But do not panic if you do not feel 6 movements. Less activity may simply mean the baby is sleeping.

If you do not feel 6 movements during the 2-hour period, call your health professional right away.

Related Information

Credits

Current as of: May 29, 2019

Author: Healthwise Staff
Medical Review:
Sarah Marshall MD - Family Medicine
Brian D. O'Brien MD - Internal Medicine
Adam Husney MD - Family Medicine
Kathleen Romito MD - Family Medicine
Kirtly Jones MD - Obstetrics and Gynecology

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