Shock in Children

Shock may quickly occur after a sudden illness or injury. When the body loses too much blood or fluid, there is no longer enough fluid in the body to carry enough blood to the vital organs.

A child may be in shock if one or more of the following signs are present:

  • Passing out (losing consciousness)
  • Acting confused. The child may not know where he or she is.
  • Being very sleepy or hard to wake up
  • Breathing fast
  • Not responding to being touched or talked to

Also, a child in shock has a weak, rapid heart rate and low blood pressure.

Shock is a life-threatening condition. Immediate medical care is required any time shock is suspected.

Is it an emergency?

If you or someone in your care has chest pains, difficulty breathing, or severe bleeding, it could be a life-threatening emergency. Call 9-1-1 or the local emergency number immediately.
If you are concerned about a possible poisoning or exposure to a toxic substance, call Poison Control now at 1-800-567-8911.

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