Pump Bump (Haglund's Deformity)

"Pump bump," or Haglund's deformity, is a type of bursitis of the heel. Bursitis is an inflammation of the sacs (bursae) that contain small amounts of lubricating fluid to help joints move smoothly.

A shoe rubbing on the back of the heel may cause the bump to form. The friction stimulates growth of a bone spur that then irritates the bursa. This is most often seen in women who wear high heels.

Common symptoms may include:

  • A bump on the back and outside of the heel.
  • Tenderness.
  • A callus.
  • A clicking sensation when you press on the bump.

Treatment aims to relieve shoe pressure and friction over the bump. Measures to relieve pressure include using a thick heel pad or sponge insert or switching to sandals, clogs, or shoes with a soft heel counter and no obvious seams or stitching over the ridge. Home treatment, such as massaging the area with ice, taking non-prescription anti-inflammatory medicines, and alternating between ice or a heat pack may help further relieve symptoms. If home treatment doesn't work, surgery may be needed.

Is it an emergency?

If you or someone in your care has chest pains, difficulty breathing, or severe bleeding, it could be a life-threatening emergency. Call 9-1-1 or the local emergency number immediately.
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