Botulism

Botulism is a rare but very serious type of foodborne illness caused by toxins produced by bacteria (Clostridium botulinum) that are commonly found in soil. Botulism is often caused by food that is not home-canned properly, such as home-canned beans and corn.

In children younger than 1 year, botulism may be caused by bacteria found in honey. An adult's digestive system can defend against the bacteria in these foods, but an infant's digestive system cannot. Do not give honey to children younger than 12 months.

Symptoms of botulism usually begin 12 to 36 hours after the person eats contaminated food. Symptoms include blurred or double vision, muscle weakness, fatigue, dizziness, and headache. The person may also have nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and abdominal pain. The most noticeable symptoms in children include double vision, irritability, and muscle weakness. Some children may have vomiting, constipation, inability to pass urine (urinary retention), and a dry mouth.

Botulism is potentially fatal and requires immediate medical care. People who have botulism will often be admitted to a hospital for treatment.

Is it an emergency?

If you or someone in your care has chest pains, difficulty breathing, or severe bleeding, it could be a life-threatening emergency. Call 9-1-1 or the local emergency number immediately.
If you are concerned about a possible poisoning or exposure to a toxic substance, call Poison Control now at 1-800-567-8911.

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