Ovarian cancer risk

For women with an average risk

For women with an average risk
slide 1 of 5
    
slide 1 of 5, For women with an average risk,

Most women have an average risk of ovarian cancer. About 1 out of 100 women will get ovarian cancer sometime during their lives.

[Chart based on National Cancer Institute (2013). Ovarian Cancer Prevention PDQ—Health Professional Version. Available online: http://nci.nih.gov/cancertopics/pdq/prevention/ovarian/healthprofessional.]

For women who have one relative with ovarian cancer

For women who have one relative with ovarian cancer
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slide 2 of 5, For women who have one relative with ovarian cancer,

If one woman in your family—such as a mother, a sister, or a daughter—has had ovarian cancer, your risk of getting it is a littler higher than women who don't have a family history of the disease. About 5 out of 100 women with one relative who has had ovarian cancer will get this cancer sometime during their lives.

[Chart based on National Cancer Institute (2013). Ovarian Cancer Prevention PDQ—Health Professional Version. Available online: http://nci.nih.gov/cancertopics/pdq/prevention/ovarian/healthprofessional.]

For women who have two or three relatives with ovarian cancer

For women who have two or three relatives with ovarian cancer
slide 3 of 5
    
slide 3 of 5, For women who have two or three relatives with ovarian cancer,

If two or more relatives have had ovarian cancer, your risk of getting it goes up. About 7 out of 100 women with two or more relatives who have had ovarian cancer will get this cancer sometime during their lives.

[Chart based on National Cancer Institute (2013). Ovarian Cancer Prevention PDQ—Health Professional Version. Available online: http://nci.nih.gov/cancertopics/pdq/prevention/ovarian/healthprofessional.]

For women who have BRCA1 gene changes

For women who have BRCA1 gene changes
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slide 4 of 5, For women who have BRCA1 gene changes,

Some women have BRCA1 gene changes. Their risk of getting ovarian cancer is much higher than average. For these women, about 40 out of 100 women will get ovarian cancer by age 70.

[Chart based on National Cancer Institute (2016). BRCA1 and BRCA2: Cancer risk and genetic testing. National Cancer Institute. http://www.cancer.gov/about-cancer/causes-prevention/genetics/brca-fact-sheet. Accessed April 6, 2016.]

For women who have BRCA2 gene changes

For women who have BRCA2 gene changes
slide 5 of 5
    
slide 5 of 5, For women who have BRCA2 gene changes,

Some women have BRCA2 gene changes. Their risk of getting ovarian cancer is also higher than average. For these women, about 11 to 17 out of 100 women will get ovarian cancer by age 70.

[Chart based on National Cancer Institute (2016). BRCA1 and BRCA2: Cancer risk and genetic testing. National Cancer Institute. http://www.cancer.gov/about-cancer/causes-prevention/genetics/brca-fact-sheet. Accessed April 6, 2016.]

Current as ofDecember 19, 2018

Author: Healthwise Staff
Sarah Marshall MD - Family Medicine
Donald Sproule MDCM, CCFP - Family Medicine
Kathleen Romito MD - Family Medicine
Adam Husney MD - Family Medicine
Ross Berkowitz MD - Obstetrics and Gynecology
Wendy Y. Chen MD, MPH MD, MPH - Medical Oncology, Hematology

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