Eating Protein

Topic Overview

Protein is made of building blocks called amino acids. Although the human body can make some of these amino acids, nine of them (the essential amino acids) must be obtained from food. Soy foods and animal sources of protein (milk, eggs, meat, poultry, fish, and seafood) contain all the essential amino acids in the amounts our bodies need.

Most plant foods contain some of the essential amino acids in varying amounts. Beans have some amino acids, and grains have other amino acids. Eating these different types of food throughout the day will provide your body with adequate protein.

Foods that contain protein

  • Lean meat, poultry, or fish. A cooked serving is 75 grams (2.5 oz). (75 grams is about the size and thickness of a deck of cards or the palm of your hand.) You can use your hand to judge other portion sizes.
  • Protein isn't just found in meat. If you are a vegetarian or just looking for alternatives to meat, the following are equal to approximately 75 grams of meat:
    • ¾ cup (175 mL) cooked beans, peas, or lentils
    • ¾ cup (175 mL) tofu
    • ¼ cup (60 mL) nuts or seeds
    • ¾ cup (175 mL) hummus
    • 2 eggs
    • 2 Tbsp (30 mL) peanut butter or other nut or seed butter
  • Other sources of protein include cheese, milk, and other milk products.
  • You can also buy protein bars, drinks, and powders. Check the nutrition label for the amount of protein in each serving. Protein supplements can be helpful if you are trying to replace weight, heal, or recover from illness or surgery. It's important to choose real foods that are high in protein first, before trying a protein supplement.

Health Tools

Health Tools help you make wise health decisions or take action to improve your health.

Credits

ByHealthwise Staff
Primary Medical Reviewer Sarah A. Marshall, MD - Family Medicine
Brian O'Brien, MD, FRCPC - Internal Medicine
Kathleen Romito, MD - Family Medicine
Adam Husney, MD - Family Medicine
Elizabeth T. Russo, MD - Internal Medicine
Specialist Medical Reviewer Rhonda O'Brien, MS, RD, CDE - Certified Diabetes Educator

Current as ofMarch 29, 2018

Is it an emergency?

If you or someone in your care has chest pains, difficulty breathing, or severe bleeding, it could be a life-threatening emergency. Call 9-1-1 or the local emergency number immediately.
If you are concerned about a possible poisoning or exposure to a toxic substance, call Poison Control now at 1-800-567-8911.

Thanks to our partners and endorsers: